Getting a decent data connection at SXSW can be a challenge, given that it attracts what may be the most data-hungry crowd in the world. With a project called Homeless Hotspots, a marketing company is helping out with this, while helping the homeless and promoting itself. Homeless people have been enlisted to roam the streets wearing T-shirts that say “I am a 4G hotspot.” Passersby can pay what they wish to get online via the 4G-to-Wi-Fi device that the person is carrying. It is a neat idea on a practical level, but also a little dystopian. When the infrastructure fails us… we turn human beings into infrastructure?
David Gallagher (NYT) - on Homeless Hotspots - or turning the homeless into infrastructure for the privileged in order to get column inches during SXSW.

Trash | Track is an investigation into understanding the ‘removal-chain’ in urban areas. TrashTrack uses hundreds of small, smart, location aware tags, which are attached to different types of trash so that these items can be followed through the city’s waste management system, revealing the final journey of our everyday objects in a series of real time visualisations.

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Parking Ticket Machine: An Anatomy
"Each of these pay-and-display parking ticket machines costs in the region of US$11000, and there are more than 1200 of them around Copenhagen - and all they do is print little slips of paper to allow people to park their cars. An extreme example of “magnificent bits of infrastructure just lying around”.
A small part of Mayo Nissen's excellent City Tickets thesis for CIID.

Parking Ticket Machine: An Anatomy

"Each of these pay-and-display parking ticket machines costs in the region of US$11000, and there are more than 1200 of them around Copenhagen - and all they do is print little slips of paper to allow people to park their cars. An extreme example of “magnificent bits of infrastructure just lying around”.

A small part of Mayo Nissen's excellent City Tickets thesis for CIID.