Tableau by John Kestner is an refinished heirloom nightstand that stores and retrieves memories using a Twitter account. It acts as a bridge between users of physical and digital media, taking the best parts of both. The nightstand quietly drops photos it sees on its Twitter feed into its drawer, for the owner to discover. Images of things placed in the drawer are posted to its account as well.

The Journey is the second of two video sketches by BERG illustrating some of the ideas and principles behind Dentsu London's communications strategy Making Future Magic

They take a look at the variety of screens and media surfaces in a train station and the possibilities that open up from seeing them slight differently.

There’s no real new technology at play in any of these ideas, just different connections and flows of information being made in the background – quietly, gradually changing how screens, bits of print ephemera such as train tickets, and objects in the world can inter-relate to make someone’s journey a bit less stressful, a bit more delightful.

More info on the BERG blog

Pay-and-display parking ticket machines are an example of an intensely technological piece of urban infrastructure. City Tickets by Mayo Nissen explores how we can use these ubiquitous and expensive boxes to make cities more responsive to the needs of those who live in them, and proposes a service through which ticket machines become a communication channel between citizens and their local authorities.
By taking functions that may otherwise be found on websites or interacted with through mobile devices, and physically embedding them directly in the urban fabric, City Tickets democratises access and input to municipal services and brings that dialogue to where it is most relevant and powerful: here and now.

Pay-and-display parking ticket machines are an example of an intensely technological piece of urban infrastructure. City Tickets by Mayo Nissen explores how we can use these ubiquitous and expensive boxes to make cities more responsive to the needs of those who live in them, and proposes a service through which ticket machines become a communication channel between citizens and their local authorities.

By taking functions that may otherwise be found on websites or interacted with through mobile devices, and physically embedding them directly in the urban fabric, City Tickets democratises access and input to municipal services and brings that dialogue to where it is most relevant and powerful: here and now.

SXSW Fieldnotes

James Bridle has made a book for the post digital panel at SXSW.

It’s designed to last you the week you’re at SXSW and features maps, a diary, schedule, info pulled from the Lonely Planet guide to Texas and space for you to write notes.

According to James it was:

“Pulled together in a few hours at the last minute despite planning it for ages. HTML -> XML -> InDesign for the talks schedule. Simple PDF resizing for the LP section. Basic-as layout for the rest, with some running heads and page numbers to minimise endless searching. Printed 10 through Lulu – £5 a pop, plus £25 to expedite shipping (because I left it until the last possible moment). Arrived in 4 working days. Done.”

It’s great but I can’t help thinking it could have had more hooks back into the digital domain. I’m not entirely sure what and how but It feels like you should be able to use it as a jumping off point to go and get more content, submit content or communicate with the other owners of the book.

There’s more information on Booktwo.org if you’re interested.

Recently I went to the Science Museum to have a close look at the Difference Engine, and while I was there I saw these lovely paper shapes.
My first thought was that it would be amazing to have a machine that makes things like these as physical representations of data – but because I’m not a programmer I filed it under “things to talk about when I next see someone that knows about this kind of thing”.
Well, reading Codelog it seems that someone has just gone half way to doing it in Processing. They’re using an image to generate the height map but if that image was generated by data then we’d have something really interesting.

Recently I went to the Science Museum to have a close look at the Difference Engine, and while I was there I saw these lovely paper shapes.

My first thought was that it would be amazing to have a machine that makes things like these as physical representations of data – but because I’m not a programmer I filed it under “things to talk about when I next see someone that knows about this kind of thing”.

Well, reading Codelog it seems that someone has just gone half way to doing it in Processing. They’re using an image to generate the height map but if that image was generated by data then we’d have something really interesting.